Monday, January 24, 2005

Fiction & Life: Pop Music & Politics

For a current very intriguing & amusing short article that connects (a type of) fiction to (a type of) real life, click here:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A27938-2005Jan21?language=printer

Nb: The title of a blog post can be given an active link -- like this one has.

8 comments:

xcentrik9 said...

I don't know which is more interesting: the parallel between song and speech, or the fact that someone was able to recall this song and research it properly.

Dr. S.A. Ogden said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Dr. S.A. Ogden said...

Some people live for pop music -- if you've ever read or watched Nick Hornby's "High Fidelity."
Another effective thing about the article is that it can be read as for or against the politician: so the writer doubles his satisfied readership.

Dr. S.A. Ogden said...

Hello. I am new to this blog concept so I have a few questions. While reading this one about Bush's speech, I would have never thougth this 'blog' was a type of fiction. Also, while looking at ghostofaflea.com, I always thought of that being an open forum. So is that the same thing as a blog?

Dr. S.A. Ogden said...

Sorry, I forgot to sign my name to the previous post.

Lindsay

heretic said...

In journalism there is a thing called an "evergreen" story, this is a type of news story that is always applicable no matter the timing (often pulled out of the filing cabinet on slow news days). I don't know what the equivalent would be in speech writing but I think the similarity between the song lyrics and the speech is indicative of this type of writing. I mean who in America would think freedom was a bad thing? It's a popular American value.

Dr. S.A. Ogden said...

Those are exactly the right questions to be asking! The classical method of understanding a concept -- fiction, in our instance -- is by *difference*. That is, identify the qualities of two apparently similar concepts and once you have detailed the similarities, the remaining differences are those specific qualities which make the one concept unique.
So, here, if we see what blogs have in common with stories (& vice versa) and in what ways they differ, the differences will be our identifying marks of Fiction. Q.E.D.

Dr. S.A. Ogden said...

Brittney: that's clearly an keen intellectual response. Beside the pro- and anti- interprestations of the lyrical fiction, yours is a mediating analysis. Excellent!